How would you describe your national identity?

Important information:

If you are completing the paper census questionnaire please use the paper census guidance.

Why we ask this question

Your answer helps your community by giving your local authority a better understanding of how people in your area identify themselves.

This information can highlight areas of deprivation among different cultural groups in your community. This gives public bodies a clearer picture of the communities they serve.

The census first asked this question in 2011.

It's up to you how you answer this question. Select all the national identities that apply. You can select more than one.

Your national identity is what you think it is

Your national identity could be the country or countries where you feel you belong or think of as home. It's not dependent on your ethnic group or citizenship.

This question allows you to record an identity that isn't listed, if you want to.

For example, you can:

  • answer as "British" and/or one of the other UK identities
  • answer with a British or other identity separately from recording your ethnic group in the next question
Example

Tina was born in Kenya but now lives in England. Her mother is Japanese and her father is English. Tina has spent a great deal of time in Japan and feels a strong connection to the country. Tina describes her identity as British-Japanese.

Tina selects the option that says: "British".

She also selects the option that says "Other" and enters "Japanese".

National identity not listed

If yours isn't listed, select "Other" and enter your national identity in the space provided, such as Cornish, Irish, Polish or Indian. You can give more than one answer if you want to.

You can also use this space to record a community or regional identity.

When you start typing, suggested answers will appear. You can select from this list or continue typing your own answer if your identity isn't listed.

Important information:

Answering for someone else

If you're answering on behalf of someone else, where possible you should ask them how they want to answer. If they're away, select the answer you think they would choose.